422, photojournalism

NYC: street photography, Central Park (part one)

Stefan Mummert, from Berlin, Germany, and girlfriend, Theresa Kraemer kiss in Central Park. Mummert is in New York for a week visiting his girlfriend who works in DC. They are spending the weekend in New York City.

Theresa Kraemer poses for a photo for her boyfriend, Stefan Mummert in Central Park. Mummert, from Berlin, Germany, is in New York for week visiting his girlfriend who works in DC. They are spending the weekend in New York City.

Molly May climbs a tall rock in Central Park. She is bouldering, free climbing without any ropes. May spent the afternoon with her brother, Micah May who has been climbing for over a decade.

A friendly game of soccer in a leaf-covered field in Central Park, Nov. 19.

Break dancers impress a crowd of onlookers in Columbus Circle, outside of Central Park.

A Salvation Army worker shakes his bells and booty at Columbus Circle outside of Central Park, Nov. 18.

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422, photojournalism

Occupy Wall St, Nov. 17 Global Day of Action: part 3

Part three of my series of Occupy Wall St Nov. 17 Global Day of Action:

After protesters broke free of the standoff with police over getting in or out of Zuccotti, the occupiers marched 2.4 mi to Union Sq for the student protest rally. The NYPD marched beside the protesters in the street kicking most on the sidewalk. At Union Sq a hundreds met in solidarity for students and educators. After The students took to the streets and completely stopped traffic. Look outs ran ahead to see what streets the police had barricaded to control the direction of the protesters.

(we waited for the crowd to move along, then got onto the subway to Foley Sq)

An estimated 30,000 people convened in Foley Sq. A sea of protesters each with different signs and reasons to participate in OWS’s Global Day of Action. A long police barricaded-off path was created for protesters marching to the Brooklyn Bridge. This time OWS community supporters helped with NYPD to keep protesters on the legal foot path bridge.

There unexpectedly, a slide of projections appeared on the Verizon Wireless building overlooking the Bridge. 99% flashed on the building, along with a mic check, in which the projection had the occupiers on the Brooklyn Bridge sing Happy Birthday to the two-month old Occupy Wall St movement.

Some protesters, tired with miles in their soles took the subway home, many- in true fashion- attended the General Assembly.

Nov. 15’s eviction was just a step in the evolution of this movement, as many sign read “you can’t evict an idea.”

A makeshift drum line marches

OWS protesters march from Zuccotti Park to Union Sq. with NYPD police following them along the sidewalks edge the whole 2.4 mi walk.

Union Sq, OWS student protest

"WE'RE BACK" OWS protesters at Union Sq Nov. 17

An man sits and reads "The Master Game" inside a Barnes & Noble overlooking Union Sq. and OWS's student protest on Nov. 17 Global Day of Action

The People's Library found a temporary spot occupying the sidewalk outside of Barnes & Noble in Union Sq. The books of OWS's People's Library were thrown into a dumpster when NYPD officials evicted Zuccotti Park protesters. The remaining books were carried around by protesters during Nov. 17 OWS's national day of action

OWS People's Library books

Student protesters take over the street

Student protesters take over the street and block all traffic, even leaving a sign leaned up against a stopped car.

Occupy the Subways

est. 30,000 people convene in Foley sq

Sara_lauren, last name with held, cries during a song sung by senior citizens over the microphone during Occupy Wall St's rally at Foley Sq during OWS Nov. 17 Global Day of Action. "I'm just so moved by the collection of people i couldn't of people i couldn't help crying," said Sara-Lauren a musician/rapper from Brooklyn.

Foley Sq. march to the Brooklyn Bridge

An NYPD officer on horseback takes a photo of OWS protesters marching from Foley Sq. to the Brooklyn Bridge as they snap photos of him, while another police officer tells them to keep moving.

unexpectedly, projects appeared on the Verizon Wireless building beside the Brooklyn Bridge. 99% flashed on the building, along with a mic check, in which the projection had the occupiers on the Brooklyn Bridge sing Happy Birthday to the two-month old Occupy Wall St movement.

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422, photojournalism, travel

Occupy Wall St, Nov. 17 Global Day of Action: part 2

Images from the early afternoon on Occupy Wall St’s Nov. 17 Global Day of Action. From Zuccotti Park to the fight to march down Wall St and back to the park where a cat and mouse game ensued with the NYPD barricades and the Occupiers. It was a game of strategies before the thousands of occupiers left Zuccotti and marched 2.4 miles to Union Sq.

Early afternoon rally at Foley Park, Nov. 17.

NYPD in riot gear line up along Wall St keeping protesters out of the street, Nov. 17.

A scuffle between NYPD and protesters led to OWS medics being called in on Wall St., Nov. 17

Christian Ruiz, 18, and girlfriend Bianca Rosario, 17 hug on Wall st. during Nopv. 17's OWS national day of action. Both attend the Borough of Manhattan Community College. When asked about the occupy movment, Ruiz said "I like it- it makes sense fighting for the future."

Occupiers dance in celebration when retaking Zuccotti Park Nov. 17

Troy Odendhal stands near a meditating occupier. Odendhal is at Occupy Wall St for his father, a part-time transist worker who was unjustisly fired for a work injury.

Occupy Wall St, Nov. 17 national day of action at Zuccotti Park.

The books of OWS's People's Library were thrown into a dumpter when NYPD offcials evicted Zuccotti Park protesters. The remaining books were carried around by protesters during Nov. 17 OWS's national day of action

Zuccotti Park after the eviction of the protesters as seen during on Nov 17.

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422, photojournalism

Occupy Wall St, Nov. 17 Global Day of Action: part 1

A bloodied protester. Reports said he threw a battery at a police officer and stole an officer's hat then ran back into the park. Zuccotti Park, NYC National Day of Action Nov. 17

A man stomps NYPD barricades. A woman occupier nearby shouted at him to stop causing a ruckus and that destroying property was not productive to the movement. Zuccotti Park, NYC National Day of Action Nov. 17

Troy, last name with held, sits in Zuccotti park during a lull in Nov. 17's protests. Zuccotti Park, NYC National Day of Action Nov. 17

The NYPD and Occupiers were in a cat and mouse game for most of the day's actions. An occupier yells at a police officer. Zuccotti Park, NYC National Day of Action Nov. 17

"Banks got bailed out, books got thrown out!" yelled protesters during Occupy Wall St's Nov. 17 Day of Action. The People's Library travled from Zuccotti Park, to Union Sq, to Foley Sq, and lastly accross the Brooklyn Bridge where it found it's home for the night. The People's Library temporaily occupied the sidewalk outside of Barnes & Noble in Union Sq.

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422, photojournalism

Tent City, Ann Arbor: Mo’ Life Transitions

Mo re-sets up his tent. He had previously lived in Ann Arbor's tent city for a month before moving into a friend's. He is now back to weather the winter in the camp. Mo is orginally from Montana where he frequently camped out on his family's land. Mo says this weather will prove how much of a Montana boy he is.

Mo just moved back into his tent at the homeless community, Tent City or Camp Take Care in Ann Arbor. "My goal is to make at least five people smile everyday," said Mo the self-defined optimist. He is currently selling community newspapers in downtown Ann Arbor, selling plasma in Ypsilanti and looking into buying an RV trailer with a friend.

Mo's friend and tent city neighbor, Tate, manged to scrounge up a couple sharpies for Mo. Mo is an aspiring tattoo artist, but his portfolio and pens where stolen by his last girlfriend. "This is home to me," he said as he reset up his tent "It's all my stuff that no one will fuck with," stated Mo. "I didn't have a place, so these guys gave me one, so i try to help out (the camp) anytime i can."

Mo, originally David Slater, got his nickname from his uncle who gave him a shirt that said "Mo'Bud" a reference to the fact that Mo always had some pot on him. People would ask is he had 'anymo' bud?'. The name stuck.

Mo holds his favorite book "Go Ask Alice", a book about youth and addiction. "I try to read an hour a day cause it gets you out of your head," said Mo. He was once a drug addict himself, the oldest and black sheep of his family, Mo got into drugs really young and was kicked out of his home at 15.

Mo’ Life Transitions

David Slater, or better known to his friends as Mo, moved back into his tent in a legal homeless tent community in Ann Arbor in late November. Mo, originally from Montana, plans to weather out his first winter in “Camp Take Care.” The camp is a drug and alcohol free encampment allowed by the city of Ann Arbor to take up occupation next to I-94 and US-23.

Mo was kicked out of his home at 15 for using hard drugs. His uncle introduced him to meth at a young age. Mo hasn’t used meth in over 4 years. He is a daily pot smoker though, his name came from a shirt his uncle gave him which said “Mo’Bud”; a reference to the fact that Mo always had some pot on him. People would ask is he had ‘anymo’ bud?’. The name stuck.

Mo has also stayed at a similar tent city in Seattle. Although his life is constantly in transition, Mo always wears a smile on his face. “My goal is to make at least five people smile everyday,” said Mo the self-defined optimist. He is currently selling community newspapers in downtown Ann Arbor, selling plasma in Ypsilanti and looking into buying an RV trailer with a friend.

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422, photojournalism

Ruth Scherer: a female jockey’s race out of the gates

Ruth kisses, 4-year-old Titus, after riding him around the track. "He's my favorite horse here," she said. "Not many race horses you want to ride- but he's a good boy."

Ruth is in her jockey apprenticeship stage, she must complete 40 wins before moving on to the next stage. Ruth plans on going to Hialeyigha, a race track in Miami, Florida during the winter season to race only quarter horses. She may not get many mounts at this track, but "I won't know if I don't try."

Trainer, Raphel, hugs Ruth after her first quarter house win at Mount Pleasant Meadows, Saturday Sept. 35. "Thanks for winning me $150 bucks," said Raphel as he congratulated Ruth. She rode, Tough to Get Six, her uncle's horse in her winning race.

In the early morning Ruth rides out to the track to gallop and exercise the horse. Her best friend at the track, Saria Persall leads her out of the barn. Ruth rides over 15 horses a day. "I used to ride up to 30 before Tommy got here." Ruth's boyfriend of 8 years, Tommy, is also a jockey and rides multiple horses each morning. They begin their morning around 7am and end around 11am or later. "I used to end at 5pm, shower, go straight to bed and then wake up at 4am."

Julie and Ruth look over the race booklet for the day's races. Females jockeys are very rare in the horse racing industry even though men and women can compete at the same level as jockeys. "It's tough to be a girl in this sport- you just got to work extra hard." Mount Pleasant Meadows actually has 3 female jockeys: Julie who has been there since 1989, Kelli and now Ruth. Ruth has known both women for about 15 years.

"Everyone thinks it's such a glamorous sport," said Ruth covered in mud from nose down. "The mud can actually be really dangerous for the horse- and jockey." Ruth has wanted to be a professional jockey since she was 15. Pulled tendons in her arm and leg, a torn ligemate, and a broken foot shattered in 5 different places have set her planes back. Ruth now 32 is into her first season as a race jockey and will not be slowing down anytime soon.

Ruth Scherer: a female jockey’s race out of the gates

“It’s tough to be a girl in this sport- you just got to work extra hard,” said Ruth Scherer a female jockey at Mount Pleasant Meadows race track, Mount Pleasant, MI.

Ruth has wanted to be a jockey since she was 15-years-old, when she was put on her first race horse. For years, Ruth competed in show horse competitions and won many world medals, but she felt like she needed something more challenging. So Ruth made the transition into a different type of horse-related sport, horse racing.

Ruth is currently in her jockey apprenticeship stage, which means she must complete 40 wins before earning her jockey license. Since she has just begun it is hard to get mounts on the best horses, she must earn the owners trust. However, it is hard getting mounts just being a woman jockey- even though this is one of the only sports where men and women can compete evenly.

In training to become a jockey Ruth has sustained many injuries including, pulled tendons in her arm and leg, a broken foot that was shattered in 5 different places and a torn ligemate. “Everyone thinks it’s such a glamorous sport,” said Ruth who was covered in mud from nose down after one particularly muddy race.

The competition standards at Mount Pleasant Meadows, where she is currently spending the summer/fall season, are not as strict as other tracks. Ruth will be traveling to race at either a track in Miami or West Virginia for the winter season where she will have to begin intense work out regiments and dieting to meet weight.

Six days a week Ruth arrives at the track before sunrise to exercise and train the horses for various owners. On average she rides over 15 horses a day. “I used to ride up to 30 before Tommy got here.”

Ruth’s boyfriend of 8 years, Tommy, is also a jockey and rides multiple horses each morning. They begin their morning around 7am and end around 11am or later. “I used to end at 5pm, shower, go straight to bed and then wake up at 4am.”

Ruth has loved horses since she was young and knew she always wanted to be involved in some sort of horse sport. Now that she is finally out of the starting gate, it doesn’t seem like she’ll be slowing down anytime soon.

Update: a couple weeks after this, Ruth injured her knee in a morning training session and has since has surgery. She is now taking some time to heal before she rides again.

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